A Lean Experiment

The Lean Startup is a book, by Eric Ries, which highlights Japanese manufacturing rapid-prototyping methodology as great approach for software development. Rather than doing time consuming market research and then building a finished product that you hope people will like, the Lean approach advocates building an early stage iteration and releasing it immediately for users to comment on and guide it’s development, by quickly releasing updates and monitoring their effect.

Our business has recently launched a new product that is potentially going to be a really useful to it’s target audience. We’re taking a  “lean” approach to it’s production and have put up a very early stage BETA version on the site that people can register (with a wufoo form linked to a mailchimp account) for and download (using dropbox).

From the outset users are made aware that they are downloading a development product. Once they have downloaded it they enter into a chain of 9 mailchimp auto-responder emails ( 1 every 5 days) set up to incentive them to give us feedback. The emails are written very delicately and aim to be fun to read and warm people to us.

In return for giving us feedback, we offer them some very decent incentives: one of our other products completely free, the finished version of this product (they can only currently download the free version, the full version has not been built yet) at a massive discount, the option of buying all of products and getting this product free, and, of course, our eternal gratitude.

The aim of the feedback we receive is to guide our future shaping of the product, in terms of content (it is a learning resource), price (we can vary this to measure uptake), and delivery method.

We will know that the Lean experiment has been a success if we manage to tweak (based on user feedback) the above factors to the point where users are madly sharing the free product around, we have got great feedback that the product achieves its learning objectives, and that people are pre-ordering the full version before it is released.

Can we improve this experiment? Let me know..

Increase Sales On-line

People say don’t sell by price; sell by perceived value. How much does this product/ service improve the current situation? How much is that worth?

If you can get that right, you will have the basics of a sales pitch. What else is there? This is my non-exhaustive list based on my experience of being a non-salesperson trying to sell my products:

– Knowing your competition and your unique selling proposition compared to them;
– “…..” (Insert name there) is using the product eg. Add credibility;
– ‘pre-selling’, which is to make people like you or your company, or that you talking in the same tone, with same viewpoint as them. That you understand them. Put pictures up oc yourself and a non-selling About Us page;
– removing friction from a sale- eg. Spelling errors, bad use of language or anything that puts a doubt in peoples mind about the quality of the product. Another point here is one that works for us, but not sure how many others- we took down our free trial – of which we had a 1/20 conversion rate, and experimented with static pages, text and images. This not only increased revenue (curiosity? Less distraction from the selling process?) over time, but it also meant I had more time to get on with my other jobs. It is likely we will put a trial back up when we have more resources to properly follow up the leads;
– awareness of what stage your product is at in terms of its life cycle, eg. Beta, early stage, full product- this will help you speak the right language to the type of customer you are dealing with (innovator, early adopter, mass etc), who all have different requirements from the product.

Hopefully I will add more here as I learn them.

Please give me some more tips!