Land Wiki enters the Hub Westminster Launchpad Accelerator Scheme

My new venture is now fully embedded in the Hub Launchpad Accelerator Program!

This means we have taken a round of seed funding, have a super cool new office on Haymarket, just off Piccadilly Circus, and have undertaken our first week of an intensive 14 week program. land wiki logo

The name of the project is: Land Wiki ( subject to change). Land Wiki is trying to achieve two goals with one website:

  1. Make it easier for residents to discuss and change land in their local area that has the potential for better use.
  2. Provide a comprehensive database of available land for individuals, community groups and property developers that are searching for land.

Its been a fun but gruelling first week where we’ve been stretched and tested, repeatedly challenged our assumptions, we’ve pitched, been mentored, we’ve ‘got out the building’, we’ve designed products for people with disabilities, and we’ve met a lot of cool people.

Watch this space for an update and our first publicly available demo!

How to know your customers characteristics

How to know your customers characteristics

I’m reading Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey A. Moore. It was written in the 90’s but is completely relevant now- which really surprised me about a book about technology marketing written before social media.

The book talks about differences between types of customers that tech companies have: innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards.

Each customer grouping has a different set of requirements from the products they use, for example an early adopter is interested in trying out new tech which is a bit raw but may give them a unique advantage or appearance; an early majority is the next step down along the curve, and require the product to be bug free and work well for their needs.

A company’s marketing must be targeted directly at the stage that their customers are at in the life cycle of a tech product. Between each distinct customer group is a chasm which must be carefully navigated to avoid falling into the abyss of marketing messages and product development that only loosely fit a customer segment.

The examples and companies mentioned have incredible parallels with the tech scene today. Netscape is still big and Microsoft only just getting there. I am only a couple of chapters in and fascinates already. The core concept – along with learning about the characteristics of each group and the marketing messages needed to appeal to them- is important to any entrepreneur. I think you can swap in “tech” to any product that changes an industries behaviours.

I recommend a good look at it.